Call for ex-teachers to return to the classroom

Call for ex-teachers to return to the classroom

The Department for Education (DfE) in England is asking former teachers who have the skills and time to return to the classroom on supply if possible.

The DfE explains that the Omicron variant is expected to continue to cause increased staff absence levels in the spring term, and some local areas may struggle to find sufficient numbers of supply teachers available unless former staff come forward.

Potential teachers are therefore encouraged to get the process started as soon as possible and ideally before Christmas Eve to be ready to join the workforce from January.

Those who are recently retired, or trained as a teacher and moved careers, are asked to consider whether they can find even a day a week for the spring term to help protect face-to-face education.

Supply teacher agencies across the country will continue to manage local supply and demand to help make sure schools and colleges do not need to close as a result of lack of staff.

Former teachers are encouraged to approach those agencies identified on the sign up page as being registered on the Government’s framework. 

The Disclosure and Barring Service has confirmed it will be ready to meet any spikes in demand for its service, continuing to meet its current turnaround times of 80% of Enhanced Checks issued within 14 days, of which 30% are issued within a day.

Who can sign up?

The DfE is inviting qualified ex-teachers from primary, secondary and further education to step in and help teach children and young people in school and college on a temporary basis. You may be retired, taking time off to care for children or others, or currently working in a different area, but you may be able to spare some time to help.

If returning to school as a supply teacher you can subscribe to Edapt to access high-quality employment support for your role.

Was this article helpful?

The information contained within this article is not a complete or final statement of the law.
While Edapt has sought to ensure that the information is accurate and up-to-date, it is not responsible and will not be held liable for any inaccuracies and their consequences, including any loss arising from relying on this information. This article may contain information sourced from public sector bodies and licensed under the Open Government Licence. If you are an Edapt subscriber with an employment-related issue, please contact us and we will be able to refer you to one of our caseworkers.